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Things to do in Cusco, Peru: One day three ways

Peruvian women in national clothes sell the products of their weaving in the tourist spot of Sacred Valley on the road from Cusco. Peruvian women in national clothes sell the products of their weaving in the tourist spot of Sacred Valley on the road from Cusco.
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Peruvian women in national clothes sell the products of their weaving in the tourist spot of Sacred Valley on the road from Cusco.

Peruvian women in national clothes sell the products of their weaving in the tourist spot of Sacred Valley on the road from Cusco.

PENNY PINCH

Locals say sugar is the answer to the altitude so start with sweet, Cusco-style coffee and pastries at Cafe Ayllu, Calle Almagro 133  ($6). Get your bearings in the main square at Plaza de Armas and get a feel for the city’s colonial past at Cusco Cathedral (qosqo杭州夜网m/cathedral.shtml, $10) – a gothic treasure house of Spanish-Catholic artistry built over an Inca temple. Another nearby Inca site, Qorikancha, was partly buried under a church and convent, but there’s still an atmospheric charge around its ruined altars to the sun, moon, stars and planets (qosqo杭州夜网m/qorikan.shtml, $5). Paddy’s Bar is clearly not Peruvian by design – it claims to be the world’s highest Irish-owned pub – but the pisco sours are cheap at happy hour and the shepherd’s pie is hearty (paddysirishbarcusco杭州夜网m, $15). El Tuco, a few blocks from the centre, is run by a local couple, with cosy, affordable rooms (eltuco杭州夜网m/cuscoperu-en/index-en.php, doubles from $50).

TOTAL: $86EASY DOES IT

You can load up on Belgian waffles and coffee at The Meeting Place Cafe without feeling too much like a greedy gringo, since most of the proceeds go to local community projects (themeetingplacecusco杭州夜网m, $20). The surrounding San Blas district has become Cusco’s art quarter, where you can shop around for gold and silver jewellery, tapestries and Quechua handicrafts. At ChocoMuseo you can find out how chocolate fuelled Inca civilisation, and taste the best stuff from nearby cacao plantations (chocomuseo杭州夜网m/english/our-locations/cusco-per). Take a dinner class with Cusco Cooking, where you’ll learn how to make classic local dishes (cuscocooking杭州夜网m, from approx $40 per person). Peruvian grape brandy is served in many cocktail variations at Chilcano Pisco Bar (Calle Plateros 326,  $25). El Balcon is a quiet place to crash in a lovingly restored pre-colonial house (balconcusco杭州夜网m, doubles from $80).

TOTAL: $165SPLASH OUT

Have an early gourmet breakfast at Cicciolina, with fresh bread from the in-house bakery (cicciolinacuzco杭州夜网m, $30). Pop into Planetarium Cusco, an offbeat attraction that superimposes Incan cosmology and astrology over modern maps of the constellations (planetariumcusco杭州夜网m, $12), before boarding the Belmond Hiram Bingham luxury train to Machu Picchu. Nobody comes to Cusco without making a pilgrimage to those spectacular mountaintop ruins, and this is by far most comfortable way to go – in a plush observation carriage with fine food and wine included, followed by an expert guided tour of the site (belmond杭州夜网m/hiram-bingham-train, round-trip from $700 approx). Squeeze in a massage at Inca Spa (incaspa杭州夜网m/en, from $50 for 30 minutes), then settle into a patio suite at Inkaterra La Casona, a beautifully restored colonial manor house that once hosted the revolutionary aristocrat Simon Bolivar (inkaterra杭州夜网m/inkaterra/la-casona, from $560).

TOTAL: $1360 approx

The writer was a guest of Inkaterra La Cascona.

Dairy rarity: quadruplet calves born

Four handfuls: Jervois dairy farmer Rupert Gazzola checks on his 12-hour-old quadruplet Illawarra-Murray Grey calves last week.Jervois has long been known for its ties to dairy farming but the small town witnessed a rarity in the industry.
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Rupert Gazzola’s 11-year-old Illawarra cow defied the odds last week and gave birth to four Illawarra-Murray Grey calves.

The quadruplets, two bulls and two heifers, were naturally conceived and born without any complications.

Mr Gazzola, an agricultural science student, said he had learned his cow had given birth, and that all four calves were alive and healthy, via a phone call while he was at university.

“I was pretty shocked when I heard to be honest, I didn’t believe it,” he said.

“There’s about a one in 700,000 chance that they are quads and a one in 11 million chance that they are all born alive.

“It’s pretty unusual.”

The dairy cow has conceived about six times previously, of which just one was a set a twins.

Mr Gazzola said twin calves were not as rare in the cow industry, but quadruplets were something both his parents and grandparents had never seen in their time as dairy farmers.

“My grandparents bought the farm in 1959 and they haven’t seen four before,” he said.“None of them have had a cow or seen one with four calves.”

Mr Gazzola said the quadruplets would stay on the farm for the next year or so but probably wouldn’t join the 200-odd herd the family currently milks twice a day.

“They will be raised until they are about 18 to 20 months old and then they will be sold,” he said.

“They are all doing really well and are all healthy and strong.”

Murray Valley Standard, SA

The five places that changed me: Genevieve Lacey

Genevieve Lacey.
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Genevieve Lacey.

Genevieve Lacey.

WAPENAMANDA​

I was born in a tiny village in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. My father was an oral historian, working alongside the Enga people, to learn about their culture and stories. I remember the stillness, the beauty of this place, and I think it was here that I began a life of listening, learning by example from Dad’s work, which would take shape in another form in my own life. Growing up in a developing country shaped the way I experience the world – it taught me of the richness of other cultures, and of the great good fortune of my own life.

BALLARAT

I spent most of my childhood in this gracious goldfields town in Central Victoria, a place with a rich musical tradition, where I was fortunate to meet an extraordinary music teacher.  The winters are cold, the gardens abundant, the architecture elegant, and the art gallery full of treasures. Quiet pursuits of reading and playing music felt perfectly in keeping with this environment.

BASEL

At the age of 22, I moved to Europe to follow my dream of becoming a musician. In Europe, the home of my instrument, the recorder, I felt I could steep myself in its traditions. It was an intense time. In Switzerland, I lived the student artist’s romantic dream, rooming in an attic, studying at a hallowed institution, roaming the woods, reading poetry, walking along the Rhine and grappling with unanswerable questions about life and meaning.

ODENSE​

My next stop was Hans Christian Andersen’s town in Denmark, to study with a Swedish maestro. There, I found myself more at home, adopted by a wonderful family of artists. It was in Denmark that I learnt my craft as a musician – long hours of practice, in a climate perfectly suited to contemplative, indoor pursuits. The ties from that time I still hold dear, so every year, both work and pleasure take me back to Scandinavia.

NTARIA

I live in Australia now, and some years back, I was invited to join a project working alongside the Namatjira family: grandchildren and great-grandchildren of the legendary indigenous watercolour artist from Central Australia, Albert Namatjira​. This project took me to his place, Ntaria, and to some of the most life-changing experiences I’ve had. There, I understood that art is not separate from life. Song, story, culture, family, place, language, spirit, ancestors, all are linked.

Genevieve Lacey is inaugural Artistic Director for FutureMakers, Musica Viva’s artist development program.

See genevievelacey杭州夜网m; futuremakers杭州夜网.au

11 million to one: Quadruplet calves born in South Australia

Jervois dairy farmer Rupert Gazzola checks on his 12-hour-old quadruplet Illawarra-Murray Grey calves last week. Photo: SuppliedThe small country town of Jervois in South Australia has long been known for its ties to dairy farming and last week the small town witnessed a rarity in the industry.
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On Wednesday afternoon, Rupert Gazzola’s 11-year-old Illawarra cow defied the odds and gave birth to four Illawarra-Murray Grey calves.

The quadruplets, two bulls and two heifers, were naturally conceived and born without any complications.

Mr Gazzola, an agricultural science student, said he had learned his cow had given birth, and that all four calves were alive and healthy, via a phone call while he was at university.

“I was pretty shocked when I heard to be honest, I didn’t believe it,” he said.

“There’s about a one in 700,000 chance that they are quads and a one in 11 million chance that they are all born alive.

“It’s pretty unusual.”

The dairy cow has conceived about six times previously, of which just one was a set a twins.

Mr Gazzola said twin calves were not as rare in the cow industry, but quadruplets were something both his parents and grandparents had never seen in their time as dairy farmers.

“My grandparents bought the farm in 1959 and they haven’t seen four before,” he said.

“None of them have had a cow or seen one with four calves.”

Mr Gazzola said the quadruplets would stay on the farm for the next year or so but probably wouldn’t join the 200-odd herd the family currently milks twice a day.

“They will be raised until they are about 18 to 20 months old and then they will be sold,” he said.

“They are all doing really well and are all healthy and strong.”

MH370: Wreckage may help piece together flight’s final moments says expert Geoff Dell

What we know after debris foundBB670 key to unlocking mysteryFamilies face agonising waitMH370: Timeline to tragedyThe search for MH370: Full coverage
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Air-safety investigators say any confirmation that aircraft wreckage that washed up on a remote island in the Indian Ocean is from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 will help piece together the final moments of the jetliner’s crash.

However, they warn that the discovery of what appears to be a flaperon from the trailing edge of an aircraft wing is highly unlikely to make it easier to find the ill-fated Boeing 777.

The debris found on Reunion Island is to be sent to France for forensic examination to determine whether it is from MH370, as part of a coordinated effort with authorities from Malaysia and Australia.

Air-safety expert Geoff Dell said the wreckage, if confirmed to be from MH370, would help support modelling of the structural break up of the aircraft and how it crashed into the water.

“We may get some more evidence from it about how it separated … and how much force would have been needed to break the aircraft up to that degree,” said Dr Dell, an associate professor at Central Queensland University and a former Qantas safety manager.

“Then you can make some assumptions about what that means for the [aircraft] structure. Are we looking for lots of little pieces, or larger pieces, which will allow you to fine tune the modelling of what you are looking for?”

If it is confirmed to be from the Malaysia Airlines 777, which disappeared on March 8 last year carrying 239 people, it would be the first corroborated evidence supporting some of the assumptions that had been made, including satellite data analysis which pointed to the fact that the aircraft veered across the Malay Peninsula before crashing in the southern Indian Ocean, Dr Dell said No clues for search

However, Dr Dell cautioned that it would do little to help authorities narrow down the search area. The debris floating in the ocean for 16 months would make it hard, “if not completely impossible”, to work backwards to determine where exactly the aircraft had crashed.

“It confirms we are in the right ocean but it doesn’t necessarily confirm anything about whether we are searching in the right place,” he said. “I don’t think it helps very much, if at all.”

Nevertheless, Dr Dell said it would increase pressure on the Australian and Malaysian governments, which had already spent tens of millions of dollars on scouring the southern Indian Ocean, to continue searching for the plane.

“Where do you go next? You’ve got the whole bloody ocean to search. It will be cost prohibitive to just keep searching. Do you go north, south, east west?” he said.

The French aviation safety bureau is studying the information on the aircraft part found on Reunion Island and coordinating with their counterparts from Malaysia and Australia.

However, Australia’s Air Transport Safety Bureau, which is leading the underwater search for MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean, will not be sending any experts to Reunion Island because the overarching investigation is in the hands of Malaysian authorities. More aviation news and analysisFollow us on Twitter @BusinessDay

Neighbours TV show: Airbnb to give fans chance to sleep on set

Story on The Neighbours Bus Tour that takes tourists to the street in Glen Waverley where Neighbours is filmed , to go with story on Kylie Minogue being diagnosed with breast cancer. Pictured is Christine Alexander , Operations Manager of The Neighbours Bus Tour. Picture by Pat Scala pds Wednesday the 18th of May 2005. AGE NEWS RAMSAY STREET NEIGHBOURS SPECIALX RAMSAYST Photo: Pat Scala
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Enjoy a stay at the Willis household from Neighbours.

Guest will spend the night on the Neighbours set.

Story on The Neighbours Bus Tour that takes tourists to the street in Glen Waverley where Neighbours is filmed , to go with story on Kylie Minogue being diagnosed with breast cancer. Pictured is Christine Alexander , Operations Manager of The Neighbours Bus Tour. Picture by Pat Scala pds Wednesday the 18th of May 2005. AGE NEWS RAMSAY STREET NEIGHBOURS SPECIALX RAMSAYST Photo: Pat Scala

Story on The Neighbours Bus Tour that takes tourists to the street in Glen Waverley where Neighbours is filmed , to go with story on Kylie Minogue being diagnosed with breast cancer. Pictured is Christine Alexander , Operations Manager of The Neighbours Bus Tour. Picture by Pat Scala pds Wednesday the 18th of May 2005. AGE NEWS RAMSAY STREET NEIGHBOURS SPECIALX RAMSAYST Photo: Pat Scala

For years Neighbours fans have flocked to Pin Oak Court, in Melbourne’s Vermont South, the real-life street that plays the role of Ramsay Street in the long-running soap opera.

Now, for the first time, they can get even closer by spending the night inside one of the characters’ homes.

A special Airbnb listing offers the opportunity for fans to stay in Ramsay St and enjoy the hospitality of the famous neighbours themselves in early September.

Guests will be hosted by Alan Fletcher (Dr Karl Kennedy) and Chris Milligan (handyman Kyle Canning), as well as visiting Harold’s Store, The Waterhole and Lassiter’s Lake.

They’ll then enjoy dinner with Alan and Chris at the Willis family house, before bedding in for the night on set at the studios in Nunawading.

While it’s not an actual house on Pin Oak Court, it’s as close as the fans will get to sleeping in the actual (fictional) homes of the characters.

For a chance sleep on the Neighbours set, hopefuls need to enter on the website and say why they’d like to stay on Ramsay Street in 25 words or less by August 28.

For those that miss out, there are always the popular Neighbours tours that take fans to Pin Oak Court or to the sets.  See also: Airbnb: The blind dating of travel

Buy as a home, a business – or both

DORA CREEK
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Expressions of interest

Address: 10 Doree Place.

House: Mini Orb and Colorbond on 936square metres.

Inspect: Today 11am to 11.30am.

Closing date: Friday, October 16.

Price guide: Around $900,000.

Agent: McGrath Warners Bay, David Westerman, 0428482767 and Hannah McInerney, 0424233876.

LOCATED in a cul-de-sac overlooking the waterfront and offered to market for the first time, this beautiful home was conceived with the aim of designing a building which could be many things, including an architectural billboard for Mason Architects.

Positioned between the medical centre and the heritage-listed circa 1898 Parker house, John Mason’s own brief was to have a landmark home which could also accommodate the practice, as well as a bed and breakfast business.

The unusual design mirrors the heights of both adjacent buildings, ensuring that it is sited beautifully, and lightweight construction materials such as a two-way ribbed floating concrete floor have been used to minimise its impact on the landscape.

The timber frame has been clad externally with horizontal corrugated Colorbond and feature points in vertical Mini Orb, complemented by cedar-framed windows with double glazing to the south and on the higher level to minimise heat loss in winter.

Soundcheck plasterboard lines both interior and exterior faces with two layers to the interior. Spread over two levels, the upper level comprises a large living area, beautiful kitchen and a deck overlooking the water. There is a main bathroom on this level with a large bedroom and a walk-in robe.

On ground level are three bedrooms, two of which have en suites and a living area with a bar, CCTV and deck behind overlooking the private north-facing backyard, which has a pergola and a shed.

Also on the ground level is a large office which connects to the third bedroom and its en suite.

The double remote garage has parking for six cars and accesses a large internal laundry.

In a stand-out position within easy travel distance from Newcastle and Sydney, this house could suit a family, someone who wants a work-from-home proposition or who balances their time between the two cities but needs good access to local services.

In the heart of the commercial precinct with its shops, train station and facilities, this lakeside position offers both lifestyle and convenience in one cleverly designed package.

Where to eat in Tasmania: Chef Hugh Whitehouse

High Whitehouse showcases the best of Tasmania’s offerings. Photo: Supplied
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High Whitehouse showcases the best of Tasmania’s offerings. Photo: Supplied

High Whitehouse showcases the best of Tasmania’s offerings. Photo: Supplied

NSW country-born Hugh Whitehouse studied classic French cooking in Europe before heading Sydney restaurants Milsons and Jaspers. Whitehouse took Darley’s at Lilianfels​ in the Blue Mountains to a two-hat level and to a Best Regional Restaurant of the Year award. At Saffire Freycinet, he creates an acclaimed dining experience using seasonal and local produce. See saffire-freycinet杭州夜网m.au.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE TABLE IN TASMANIA?

Sitting at the bench in full view of the kitchen at Franklin, Hobart.  I love to watch the chefs prepare and cook amazing food.  It’s one of the best dining experiences I’ve enjoyed in recent times. See franklinhobart杭州夜网m.au.

THE LOCAL FOOD DISCOVERY OF THE PAST YEAR?

One of the team here at Saffire has a chestnut orchard and beehives on the family farm. After sampling their orgasmic chestnut flower honey, I have created a dessert around this amazing product, featuring locally grown persimmons and almonds.

WHAT IS TASMANIA’S BEST-KEPT FOOD SECRET?

My own kitchen. Living in Coles Bay, there’s nowhere else to dine. I often have friends and family stay and I enjoy cooking with them and showcasing the best of Tasmania’s offerings.

PLACE TO GO ON A DAY OFF?

The big smoke. The last few years have seen Hobart secure itself as a great food and wine destination with new venues opening regularly. Some a little quirky, the food and personalities really defining Tasmania’s style. I love Willing Brothers wine bar in West Hobart. See facebook杭州夜网m/willingbros.

FAVOURITE INDULGENCE IN TASMANIA?

Right now, it has to be Tasmanian black truffles. With the oldest truffle farms in Australia on our doorstep, there’s nothing I’d rather top my breakfast eggs with. We buy ours from Truffles of Tasmania near Deloraine. See greatwesterntiers杭州夜网.au/food-and-wine/deloraine/truffles-tasmania.

WHAT SHOULD A VISITOR AVOID, FOOD-WISE, IN TASMANIA?

Anything in a pie warmer and restaurants serving fish from Asia.

WHAT’S HOT IN TASMANIA RIGHT NOW?

Not much, it’s the middle of winter. However, enjoying a Tasmanian single malt whisky by the fireplace at Saffire is where you’ll find me on a cold winter’s day.

Airline review: Air Canada economy

Inside Air Canada’s B777. Photo: Air Canada Inside Air Canada’s B777. Photo: Air Canada
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Inside Air Canada’s B777. Photo: Air Canada

Inside Air Canada’s B777. Photo: Air Canada

THE PLANE

Boeing 777-300ER. Air Canada has 12 in its fleet and runs them on this route in a two-cabin configuration with 42 business and 307 economy class seats. THE ROUTE

Vancouver to Sydney. THE LOYALTY SCHEME

Air Canada Altitude and Aeroplan with points transferable to Star Alliance partners. CLASS

Economy, seat 58K. DURATION

Scheduled time is 15 hours 40 minutes. We touch down 52 minutes early and the cabin manager asks us to hold the airline in credit for this against future flights that might be delayed. I might have, but with no gate available, Sydney Airport buses us to the terminal, a process that soaks up all those 52 minutes and another 15 as well, so even though we land early, we arrive late. THE FREQUENCY

Daily THE SEAT

The seat has an  81-centimetre pitch and measures 47 centimetres  from armrest to armrest. The economy seats have a 13-centimetre recline. There are USB power points in most seats and three-pin plugs in two out of three seats. BAGGAGE

Carry-on allowance is one standard bag and “one personal article” with 10kg limits. Check-in allows one bag up to 23kg. If you are travelling with sporting gear like skis you pay $100 extra. If you were travelling from Europe to Canada, that baggage would fly free – that’s the consequence of competition. Qantas will be competing with Air Canada on this route this coming northern winter, so keep an eye on the allowances – they may improve.  COMFORT

This is a long flight through the night and I’m fortunate to have an empty seat next to me, but that said, my seat pocket and the carpet below are carrying the crumbs of previous passengers – the cleaners must have been through in a hurry. ENTERTAINMENT

There’s a good selection of current and classic movies and TV series for adults and children. The sound falls out of sync with the vision on my first movie, but fortunately this flaw doesn’t reoccur. I started watching The Affair on the way over, a brilliant Showtime series, and hope for more episodes on this return flight, but my hopes are dashed: even though I flew out the previous month, the line-up doesn’t appear to have been refreshed. SERVICE

The drinks trolley comes around after a time with an offer of beer, wine or soft drinks. There are spirits available, but the cabin staff won’t tell you that. I queried this with the airline, who responded that “the crew don’t offer them simply because it saves time and most people don’t request spirits”. Of course they don’t if they aren’t offered! Despite their temperance, the crew are friendly enough and frequently walk through to offer water. FOOD

It’s a 1980s wedding – the chicken or the beef. I choose the chook and it comes with a very tart salad, a stale bread roll and a dry piece of chocolate cake. Mid-flight there is a snack, chicken again, this time in a sandwich, and a couple of hours from home, breakfast comes along with a choice of pancakes or an omelette. The pancakes had all been taken by the time the trolley reached me, so the eggs it was. They did come with a fruit salad and tasting something fresh was an unbelievable treat. ONE MORE THING

Flying this route once involved a lengthy stopover in Hawaii and eliminating that is a major improvement in terms of convenience.  VERDICT

Air Canada has been voted best airline in North America five years in a row by Skytrax, and while it might be proud of the achievement, it also says something about the state of North American airlines. They’ve got some work to do.

Tested by Jim Darby, who travelled as a guest of Destination British Columbia, Travel Alberta and Destination Canada.

See also: Flight test: AirAsia X economy

See also: Flight test: South African Airways economy

AROUND THE BLOCK: Renovated station a unique find

A former police station at 25 Albert Street, Wickham, is attracting plenty of pre-auction interest.THE former Wickham Police Station was viewed by 25 parties at its first showing, ahead of its upcoming auction.
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Agent and auctioneer Anthony Merlo, of Dalton Partners, said the commanding cavity-brick and tile property on a double-size, 466-square-metre block had piqued the interest of younger buyers, as well as older baby boomers wanting a villa-style alternative to mainstream offerings.

“The original Wickham Police Station is believed to be over 120 years old,” Mr Merlo said.

“It used to house the local sergeant in charge and have a number of holding cells used as the local lock up for out-of-control ruffians and the drunk and disorderly.”

The unique property has since been tastefully renovated and features a large central hallway, three generous-size bedrooms, separate lounge and dining, north-facing sunroom, renovated traditional bathroom, Caesarstone kitchen, and laundry with floor-to-ceiling cupboards.

It also has high ceilings, hardwood floors, a combustion fireplace and two split-system airconditioners.

But, said Mr Merlo, the “jewel in the crown” is the backyard, which features a private Balinese style in-ground pool enclosure, covered alfresco area, child-safe fenced courtyard, bamboo, fountains and lighting, all surrounded by a two-metre charcoal block boundary wall.

Owner Martin Jeffery built the pool after buying the 25 Albert Street property on the spur of the moment in 2006 for $445,000.

Mr Jeffery also added the freestanding garage with its remote control door, drop ladder to a loft and plumbing to accommodate a second bathroom, a home office or studio accommodation.

Mr Jeffery works mostly out of the area as a specialist in the mining industry and no longer needs the property, which is close to the harbour and the proposed transport interchange.

Mr Merlo said he expected bidding would start at around $650,000 at the on-site auction, which will be held at 10.30am on August 8.

The property is open for inspection today from 10.30am to 11.15am or by appointment.

Terrace has best of two worlds

41 Corlette Street, Cooks Hill, combines traditional and modern.

A RECENTLY renovated Cooks Hill terrace combining turn-of-the century character with striking modern features and two courtyards will go under the hammer this month.

Agents Mark Kentwell and Russell Dawson, of PRD Nationwide Newcastle, have listed the two-bedroom, circa-1900 property at 41 Corlette Street for a friendly auction on August 12, with a price guide of more than $570,000.

Patrick Allen bought the property in 2003 after being drawn to its unique charm and location within walking distance of Darby Street, the beach, shops and public transport.

Mr Allen’s wife Erinne moved in more than five years ago and the couple consulted an interior designer before embarking on an extensive three-year renovation.

This included a new Caesarstone kitchen, laundry, ceilings, walls and skirtings; new paint inside and outside; the installation of heritage railings; new carpet upstairs; a custom-designed built-in wardrobe in the master bedroom and a pull-down staircase to the attic, which provides versatile and most handy floored loft space.

The terrace also features a multi-purpose lounge and dining area, two fireplaces, polished timber floorboards, study nook, ornate ceiling roses, two courtyards, a family bathroom upstairs and a laundry cum powder room downstairs.

“The house is very comfortable,” Mr Allen said.

“We love the way the layout flows, it makes it great for entertaining.”

The couple are upsizing to a nearby Cooks Hill property in preparation for the birth of their first child.

The property will be auctioned at 6pm on August 12 at the Watt Street Commercial Centre.

Sale breaks suburb record

62 Fishing Point Road, Fishing Point, set a new suburb record.

A LANDMARK Fishing Point residence has sold for more than $1 million at auction, setting an off-the-water record for the suburb.

Mark Campbell, of LJ Hooker Warners Bay, sold Maurice and Jane Sinclair’s country-style homestead at 62 Fishing Point Road for $1.075 million on July 9.

The single-storey house on 2205 square metres with 40 metres of road frontage has sweeping 200-degree, north-east lake views, five double bedrooms, an office and a designer kitchen.

It also has a large double garage with extra storage and workshop, a full-width bullnose verandah, landscaped lawns and gardens and an in-ground swimming pool.

Breathe easy in East Maitland

161 Brunswick Street, East Maitland, is a great entertainer.

THE owners of Rutherford’s Aussie Shade and Hot Houses relish hosting guests at their private East Maitland oasis, but the time has come to hand the property to the next generation of entertainers.

Louella and Graeme were living elsewhere in the suburb when they bought the secluded 4000-square metre block at 161 Brunswick Street about a decade ago.

“You walk down the driveway and feel like you’re in the bush when you’re only a few minutes’ walk from Greenhills,” Louella said.

“You don’t see the houses around you, you don’t hear any road noise and you can sit out the back and look out at the birds in the treetops. It’s a very private spot.”

The couple built their “inviting” McDonald Jones home about six years ago to include ample storage, five bedrooms, home office, several living areas, a large rear timber deck, open-plan kitchen and built-in speakers for the informal living and theatre rooms. It has ducted airconditioning, a walk-in linen press, three-metre ceilings, downlights, landscaped gardens with mature native and fruit trees, hot house, fernery and a garage with a workshop area.

“We just wanted to have a very easy lifestyle,” Louella said.

“Every time I go home I just feel so good and relaxed, that’s what we were looking for. You can breathe easy – it’s a tranquil retreat, somewhere you want to go and want to be.”

The couple plan to move to Palm Lake Resort at Fern Bay and spend more time with their family.

Rhonda Nyquist and Stacey Pethers, of PRD Nationwide Hunter Valley, have listed the property for $985,000.